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, if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, down the route of international organizations, that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. so let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i didn't mention on the israeli side -- i said there was a cop -- convergence on syria. there will be a discussion. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position, and it's hard to imagine, even if it's not a much of a public dimension, it's hard to imagine that's not going to be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but also a focus on this, and what if anything we in the international community can be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say, with jordan, you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all,ing in is a signal of interest which is i think important. here the private dimension has to focus as much as anything on syria. you have 400,000 syrian refugees in jordan today. 100 thon additional since the begin of this year. if the pac
to go down the u.n. road, the route of moving and international organizations, that is not road that will lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i did not mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria, but there will be private discussions on syria in israel. there'll be a private discussion with palestinians on israel as well. you have four hundred thousand palestinians in syria who are in a very vulnerable position. imagine that that is not currently part of a private conversation. sure, there'll be a focus on peace, but there will also be a focus on this. what are we doing to safeguard the palestinians that are there? goingordan, you're also to have a public and private pension. englander sends a signal of interest, which it is important, but the private pension has to focus on syria as well. you have four hundred thousand assyrian refugees in jordan today. 100,000 additional since the beginning of this year. if that pace continues, you could have 700,000 by june. the impact on jordan is actually very hard to cont
with him that says, you know if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, if you want to continue to go down the route of moving on the international organizations that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. you know i didn't mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria but there will certainly be a private discussion on syria and israel. there will be a private discussion with abu mazen on syria as well. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position and it's hard to imagine even if that is not much of a public dimension for the conversation it is hard to imagine that will not be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but there will also be a focus on this and what if anything we in the international community could be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say with jordan you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all just being there sends a signal of
look at the reform, you will want singapore's ambassador of the u.n. you tried to get india on china vetoes and you tried to take nigeria, the south africans get upset or vice versa. it's never going to happen. >> but you're absolutely right. and that's precisely the problem that for every japan, there's a south kor that says no. all the losers, the mexicos, the pakistans, the south koreas, others actually become winners and they get automatic seat in the security council at every fourth turn. now, that's a remarkable improvement for countries that have to spend millions of dollars to try to get re-elected back to the security council every four years. now, i'm saying, you have a seat. so, it's a win, win, win for the small states, the middle powers and the great powers. that's why i think eventually, not right away, the 777 formula can break the current lock on security council reform. >> great thing about this book, a lot of insight at 30,000 feet and also insight at the ground level because you live through these processes. pleasure to have you on. >> my pleasure. thank you for ha
holliday, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. security council, thank you. >> thank you. >>> we will talk to hanan a ashrawi. and later george mitchell, he, too, deeply engaged in the peace process. he will be with us as well. >>> this just in to cnn. police in chicago are investigating an early morning shooting at a nightclub that injured at least seven people in chicago. the shooting believed to be gang related. this happened just after 1:00 am at club g's on the city's south side. there had been an album release party for an unnamed rapper. six men and a woman have all been taken to hospitals. none of the injuries appear to be life threatening. no arrests so far. >>> dazzled and concerned. a senate hearing tackles the use of drones within the united states. experts testifying that drones can have practical applications, monitoring crops and livestock, looking at damage to buildings, perhaps. but lawmakers express concern, saying new legislation may be needed to protect americans' privacy and their safety. >> i think there is a real concern that the day-to-day conduct of american citize
look good for a press release to be able to say you're getting some progress in the u.n. but the only way we're going to be able to achieve that two-state solution is through direct negotiations. >> abbas has also threatened to report israel to the international criminal court for human rights violations. do you think that overall that this trip is really a lot about sort of managing relationships more than solving problems? >> well, i think the relationships are extremely important. if the palestinians went to the international criminal court, that would set back, i think, the prospects for peace and the two-state solution. i think the president will make that clear. but i do think establishing the personal relationships, talking to the people, very important. the united states will play a critical role and those personal relationships could take you a long way. >> senator ben cardin, always good to see you. thank you for coming on the program. matt, do you have a sense of what the white house would consider a successful trip? >> that's an interesting question. i think if he gets goo
the prophe prophet o. what the president should have done at the u.n. is slammed his fist on the u.n. podium and say, in no uncertain terms to the delegates, the future does not belong to the lowlife murderers who kill innocent americans. [applause] the future belongs to americans who are willing to lay their lies down on the line to protect our right of free speech. and we will never give up that right, just like will never give up our second amendment rights either. [applause] that would have been from our president a message of caring. meanwhile, here at home, our nation is facing what will likely be the biggest nonmilitary crisis in our history. you see, the president has resigned over a war, a war on the young, by putting a $6 trillion more in debt. that is a war on the young. that is in caring about you. that is an caring about your future. that isn't caring about america. because we have enemies are conducting deadly cyber attacks against us, and yet, our president continue to borrow billions of dollars from them. that, too, is conducting a war against the young. that isn't caring abo
the consumer. >> reporter: dramatic reductions came not through carbon tax or u.n. mandate, private sector forces and technologies greens oppose. >> process of fracking natural gas creates a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. >> reporter: so they oppose high i can fracturing because the more natural gas, lower the price. longer it would take before wind and solar replace fossil fuels and are cost competitive. back to you. heather: william la jeunesse, live for us, thank you. bill: the spring season pull ad houdini. where did it go? a a major snow storm is battling the midwest. that is look at white stuff throughout the country. tough going out there. it was supposed to be spring right? heather: old man winter has not given up. >> all i heard was we would have snow. i didn't hear how much we were getting. this is quite a lot. >> is this frustrating. this is march or spring. >> every year seems like it is like this. so just have to relax. bill: here we go on the 25th of march. snow records have been shattered, yet another spring storm burying parts of the country and taking its
reductions came not because of a carbon tax or a u.n. mandate but market forces and private sector technologies greens oppose. >> the process of fracking natural gas is, creates a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. >> reporter: greens also oppose fracking because it does mean more natural gas and lower prices. and that of course makes wind and solar more expensive, jon. you will continue to see the fight over fracking, about carbon taxes and subsidies for wind and solar. back to you. jon: william la jeunesse. good explanation there. thank you. jenna: your chances weren't that great of winning the fourth biggest jackpot in powerball history but somebody out there beat those 175 to 1 odds. how about that? now we're getting some word about where the winning ticket was sold. we'll have those breaking details for you up ahead. >>> the new health care law turns three years old over the weekend. what do we know about its true costs and requirements for everyday americans? we'll take a closer look ahead. [ male announcer ] every famous curve has an equally thrilling, lesser-kn
the u.n. was actually founded. you are well aware of the troubles in ireland over a 40-year period and how painful that was and how it affected life on our island, brutally and tragically and involved in enormous, enormous scale of response from so many people. the graffiti of hatred was certainly written large over our tiny island and democracy and the pursuit of democratic ideas were an integral part of winning that piece. and the united states and america was part of that. it might've well divided us. the links for so many centuries were so strong that america is in its own -- pursuit of democracy idea license so many ways. i would call the city in 1990 and 95 and 96 when the clinton administration called meetings between the representatives of ireland and the united states from a business and political point of view. i remember senator george schmidt chilled speaking about democracy. i remember him recalling his own family's involvement because of immigration and his economic circumstances. this country gave him the democratic opportunity to serve as senate leader for 20 years.
of that massacre. >> all right. the u.n. are ask being for unfettered access to syria as it launches an investigation to find out whether chemical weapons were used in the country's bloody civil war. the assad regime and rebel forces accuse each other of chemical warfare but u.s. military officials tell cnn their intelligence suggests neither side has used those weapons. >>> nearly 200 air traffic control towers on the chopping block. today, the ax will fall. the faa is likely to announce that the vast majority of 189 are up for closing today. they will shut down. they're victims of the forced spending cuts. the towers to be closed handle low to moderate amounts of air traffic and use mostly contract workers. >>> an independent analysis of the blackout at this year's super bowl finds fault with both equipment and the lines of communication. the power was cut off to have the mercedes-benz superdome causing a more than half hour delay in the game between the baltimore ravens and the san francisco 49ers. a design defect in a recently installed relay device caused the power to trip, and
, the decision to invade kuwait then the u.n. sanctions that follow that in the effect it had on iraqi society made it all the more difficult for that society to move toward stability in the wake of the saddam hussein regime. i would blame al qaeda and iraq nd those who used masss murder as a principal tactic in the war. i would ask dr. zbigniew brzezinski to visit the cities in iraq that were rocked by these murderous attacks and ask them who they blame. hey blame the people who committed those murders. in 2005 when we went to a city where life was choked out of it because of a systematic attack by al qaeda, they turned that city into their training base. it is with a connected sniper training, medical training. these are not just insurgencies that happened because people to not like america. these are organizations that mobilize resources and people. this is an enemy organization. courses offer their included kidnapping and murder. they choked the life out of the city. schools have been closed for over a year. marketplaces have a cold. communities have fallen in on themselves -- marketplaces
the situation inside of syria. there are measures we have called for, and we know the u.n. is moving forward with investigations on exactly what happened. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game changer from our perspective. because, once you let that's the situation spend out of control, it is very hard to stop and that will have enormous spillover effects across the region. and so, we are going to continue to closely consult with everybody across the region and do everything we can to break -- bring an end to the bloodshed and to allow the syrian people to get out from under a leader who was lost all legitimacy because he is willing tarot slaughter his own people. -- he is willing to slaughter his own people. it is not a question of if. is when. part of what we have to think about is what is the aftermath going to affect? and by the way, we need to think about that in a way that serves the syrian people from all walks of life, from all religious affiliations. because one of the things we know about this region is that if we fail the -- to c
are still required to pay taxes. n, one thing that is important to note is your u.s. citizen children, they are eligible for certain benefits because they are u.s. citizens. although you are not, it is important for you to know there are resources out there to support your children depending on what their needs are. i think he also raises an important question which is, what are the requirements people will have to go through in order to apply for some kind of earned citizenship. one thing considered is definitely there will be a panel become a pretty hefty penalty. second, people will have to pay fees for that application. the program will most likely have to be self sustaining. third, both the senate and house will be considering back taxes for people who may be did not pay taxes. finally, a requirement that people speak english or demonstrate an ability to speak english. that is one piece that is not known exactly yet in terms of -- will people have to pass a test, well then have to show they are enrolled in school, etc.? that is one potential area for people m people martin who do
. my question dovetails with jo n's question. based on your withdrawal from iraq, afghanistan, pivot to asia, is the u.s. committed to the gulf region and the middle east in general? if you could elaborate a little more on the general commitment in the region, and if the answer is yes, how can we find more ways to demonstrate that commitment? >> the answer is yes, and expanded answer to that would indeed be how can we find ways to demonstrate our commitment differently. this notion of withdrawing from iraq and afghanistan, as somehow indicative of less commitment to the region, i really would like to react to that. andent three years in iraq, what you have to say -- and we are all aware that tomorrow is the 10-year anniversary and the debate goes on about whether we should have, whether it was worth it, and that debate will go on. even if it is in this room, we all decide that we have a common answer to that question, it will go on, and its shadow on, and we should always be introspective about the things we do. my personal belief is that having given iraq and opportunity -- first of
to be a very exciting moment to put something together that we couldn't have thought of. >> more with n.i.h. director dr. francis collins, sunday night at :00 on c-span's "q&a." off the floor of the u.s. senate report that democrats are dropping the assault weapons ban from their gun bill, making the approval of the bill -- ban unlikely. the c.q. congressional quarterly reports that senator dianne feinstein of california all but conceded today that the assault weapons banshee has spent months urging congress to renew will not become law. saying quote i very much regret it, i tried my best, but i guess my best wasn't good enough she told reporters before going to the weekly party lunches with senate democrats. on the senate side they'll being back this afternoon at 2:15. we expect the house to be back about the same time. until thin a conversation on female senators in the senate armed services committee and their impact on military polcy. -- policy. host: staff writer for "roll call" newspaper in washington. women changing the face of senate armed services panel. how so? guest: in the a
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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